Yoga

There are two important paradigms in Yoga, it is much more than exercise classes at the gym or Yoga studio. Sadly, this is the point of contact for many people who see it as nothing more than exercises that increase flexibility and for a relaxing in a stress free, instructor led environment.

Yoga is a group of physical, mental, and spiritual practices or disciplines which originated in ancient India. 

Yoga is one of the six orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy. 

There are a broad variety of yoga schools, practices, and goals in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Among the most well-known types of yoga are Hatha yoga [physical practice] and Rāja yoga [yoga philosophy].   

There is a strong yogic tradition in Buddhism which, for centuries, has been uninterrupted and practiced according to the Buddha’s teachings. The Buddha himself was a great Yogi, disseminating yogic teachings for forty-five years.  Yoga and Buddhism have the same spiritual root which focuses on inner practices to attain the highest wisdom through Samadhi. The Buddhist practitioner finds Yogic influences in Buddhist practices; likewise, the Yogic practitioner will find elements of the Buddha Dharma in their practices.  

The adoption of Buddhism as the state religion of Tibet allowed it to embrace many shamanistic traditions. Due to their mastery of trance states, Tibetan Bonpo shamans were healers and guides for the soul at death. The term “Shenpo” may have originally been used to designate shamans, in distinction from magicians and priests. “Bonpo” originally meant someone who invoked the gods and summoned the spirits. Exploring trance states allowed them to discover spiritual treasures that would benefit the community. These native shamans performed exorcisms, and worked to free humans from demonic influences, such as diseases, which were viewed as being caused by demons and hostile spirits. Many of the colorful aspects of Tibetan Buddhism, such as magic, mantras, various devotional offerings, and the worship of gods 

There are two important paradigms in Yoga, it is much more than exercise classes at the gym or Yoga studio. Sadly, this is the point of contact for many people who see it as nothing more than exercises that increase flexibility and for a relaxing in a stress free, instructor led environment.

Yoga is a group of physical, mental, and spiritual practices or disciplines which originated in ancient India. 

Yoga is one of the six orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy. 

There are a broad variety of yoga schools, practices, and goals in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Among the most well-known types of yoga are Hatha yoga [physical practice] and Rāja yoga [yoga philosophy].   

There is a strong yogic tradition in Buddhism which, for centuries, has been uninterrupted and practiced according to the Buddha’s teachings. The Buddha himself was a great Yogi, disseminating yogic teachings for forty-five years.  Yoga and Buddhism have the same spiritual root which focuses on inner practices to attain the highest wisdom through Samadhi. The Buddhist practitioner finds Yogic influences in Buddhist practices; likewise, the Yogic practitioner will find elements of the Buddha Dharma in their practices.  

The adoption of Buddhism as the state religion of Tibet allowed it to embrace many shamanistic traditions. Due to their mastery of trance states, Tibetan Bonpo shamans were healers and guides for the soul at death. The term “Shenpo” may have originally been used to designate shamans, in distinction from magicians and priests. “Bonpo” originally meant someone who invoked the gods and summoned the spirits. Exploring trance states allowed them to discover spiritual treasures that would benefit the community. These native shamans performed exorcisms, and worked to free humans from demonic influences, such as diseases, which were viewed as being caused by demons and hostile spirits. Many of the colorful aspects of Tibetan Buddhism, such as magic, mantras, various devotional offerings, and the worship of gods are traced to indigenous shamanism, since they are not shared by Indian Buddhism.  

This post is taken from our Student 1 Manual available by clicking on the link below.

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